Tag Archive | Michael Clement Photography

Controlled Burning in The New Forest

Annual controlled burning across the New Forest can look alarming but the process has real benefits for the Forest environment and the area will quickly recover. The practice is still widely used in spring time, particularly on grouse moors in northern England, to promote the regeneration of fresh young growth. It also has the additional benefit of reducing ticks and the risk of Lymes Disease.

Grape Harvest at Trotton Estate Vineyard

Over the last decade, the production of English wines has has risen sharply. The County of West Sussex is at the heart of this revolution partly due to the ‘green sand ‘ soil and its favourable south facing slopes. My knowledge of wine is limited to the consumption stage but one man who has a […]

Abandoned Cars

“A fixture now amongst the trees
Fighting a rusting disease
Fauna; thick ,as high as your knees
Rats established wherever they please
Detritus debris fueling irritability
Tyres collapsed, pressure fatigue.”

Armsoji

Liam Gallagher for the cover and feature story of Q Magazine

Ahead of the premiere of “As it Was‘, a film documenting the solo comeback of Liam Gallagher, the release of a new single and an album on its way, I was commissioned by Q to photograph the great front man for this month’s cover.
Liam Gallagher Cover and Feature Story for 'Q'

Wickham Horse Fair

The annual Wickham horse fair takes place on May 20th since a royal charter was granted for a livestock fair on the square in 1269. Still steeped in history and tradition, the centre of the village is closed to traffic as horses are paraded and traded. A bizarre spectacle as this Hampshire village is temporally transformed with horses crammed into the streets, tethered to any available fixed object.

Matthew Herbert for Q Magazine

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Avant garde musical pioneer Matthew Herbert is a musician, composer and producer working predominately in the field of electronic music. In this feature Matthew discusses the making of “The State Between Us”, a Brexit album contemplating what it means to be British in 2018

Portrait of Matthew HerbertMatthew-Hibbert_Michael-Clement.jpgMatthew-Hibbert-6248-Final.jpgPortrait of Matthew Herbert

‘The Breakfast Club’ for Waitrose

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Porridge, croissants, pancakes drenched in maple syrup, bagels, eggs and slices of toast were all captured in this feature for Waitrose Food magazine. I photographed five different morning meals from night workers on Brick Lane in London to players from Northampton Saints Rugby Club.

Guitar Classics

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‘My guitar is not a thing.It’s an extension of myself. It’s who I am.’

Joan Jet

 

Guitar Classics is best described as a source of eye candy to anyone with a love of guitars. Located in Webbs Road in Clapham, the shop opened in 1997. Graham was originally a maths teacher living in Chelsea but following the sale of his flat in Gunter Road, to his neighbour, John Lydon, he moved south of the river and set up the shop.

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Vintage Fender Stratocaster, Gretsch, Rickenbacker and Gibson guitars are all sold here and clients include the Maccabees, Maxi Jazz , Mark Owen, The Lavender Hillbillies and ‘a guy who raced in the Tour de France’!! The most expensive guitar sold to date was a Gibson Les Paul which fetched £9000.

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Classic Guitars-0032Classic Guitars-0041Classic Guitars-2755For the full interview with Graham written by Luke Cole read here Guitar Classics

Telephone Box Graveyard

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Where Phone boxes go to die?

The red telephone box is an icon of 20th century British design. Once commonplace on every street corner and village green, the telephone box is now a rare sight.In 2002 there were 92000 BT payphones across the Uk. Today thanks to mobile phones and 3G/4G connectivity, just 9400 red traditional boxes remain.

Designed by Sir Giles Gibert Scott, the original prototype is still under the left arch at the entrance to the Royal academy.The first telephone kiosks appeared inside shops and hotels in the early 1900s. Since that date there have been a host of variants of design including the original K2 model which stood at 9ft 4in and measured 3ft 6 across.

However all is not lost as the various redesigned variants are highly sought after by collectors.There’s a cemetry like no other just outside London.Dubbed the largest know ‘Telephone Box Graveyard’ you’ll find around 70 Kiosks currently laid to rest. Many of these long lost icons are being brought back to life  by craftsmen at  Unicorn Restorations. Once cleaned and restored these can cost anywhere between £2000 and £10000 each.

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